Feb 222017
 
New gTLDs

Let’s be clear: right now, any statements on when (or even if) a follow-up round of new gTLD applications might happen are pure conjecture.

The first round closed on April 12, 2012. Since then, the pressure has been increasing for ICANN to actually live up to the guidebook premise of launching “subsequent gTLD application rounds as quickly as possible” with ” the next application round to begin within one year of the close of the application submission period for the initial round.”

But that deadline is clearly not going to be met.

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ICANN no longer expects to complete reviewing the first round – a prerequisite for initiating a follow-up – before some time around 2020. Work has begun on imagining what a second round might look like, but that also seems a long way away from completion.

Reviews and classes

So to try and get a second round out of the gate, imaginations have been working overtime. What if only certain categories of applicants, say cities and brands, were allowed in? The logic being that by restricting applicant types, evaluating them would be easier. And not all the reviews, for all the TLD types applied for in 2012, would need to be completed before any new calls for applications go out.

For cities and geographic terms (dubbed “Geo TLDs”), where the applicant needs to show support from the local government or authorities, the initial gating process could be somewhat easier.

As for brands, there were many non-believers in 2012. Then Amazon, Axa, Barclays, BMW, Canon, Google and many others were revealed as applicants. And now those that didn’t then, certainly want to now. They are lobbying hard to get their shot as quickly as possible.

So when could that be? Those who understand ICANN know the organisation is notoriously slow at getting anything done… unless you do one of a couple of things. Get governments to push, or add symbolism to the mix. ICANN insiders who would see a second round asap are trying door number 2, by suggesting that launching a subsequent application window exactly 7 years after the first, i.e. on January 12, 2019, would satisfy the program’s initial intent for a (relatively) quick follow-up to round 1 whilst being a nice nod to history at the same time.

In the weird alternative logic universe of ICANN, that actually makes sense! Doesn’t make it any more likely to actually happen though…

Feb 162017
 
DotA

Ils étaient deux à se revendiquer du .Africa. D’un côté l’opérateur de l’extension nationale sud-africaine, le .ZA. De l’autre une business woman africaine/américaine.

ZA Central Registry (ZACR) et DotConnectAfrica (DCA) se sont battus devant l’ICANN et les tribunaux. Depuis des années. Empêchant ainsi le .Africa de devenir réalité.

Une guerre civile sans merci, sur fond de polémique en raison de la capacité de la patronne de DCA, Sophia Bekele, a susciter la controverse en multipliant les déclarations publiques fracassantes en même temps qu’elle attaquait en justice.

Continue reading »

Dec 042016
 
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This week, on December 8 and 9, the DNS Entrepreneurship Center (DNS-EC) is travelling to Cotonou, the largest city in the African country of Benin.

Set up following a memorandum of agreement signed between Egypt’s National Telecommunication Regulatory Authority and ICANN in 2014, the DNS-EC strives to develop expertise on the Domain Name System in Africa and the Middle East.

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Nov 122016
 
conf

On the face of it, the answer is a rather obvious and simple “yes”! The Internet obviously works across borders. Technically, it is a global network servicing its users wherever they may be on the planet.

But it is this very nature — the fact that the Internet is not bound to a specific country or territory — which has more and more people asking themselves whether it can really work across borders. By “work”, they don’t mean function, they mean fit into the layers of national laws and best practices that governed human interactions for years before the Internet came along.

Initiated in 2012 by former ICANN Board member Bertrand de la Chapelle, the Internet & Jurisdiction project strives to stimulate discussion and the development of operational solutions to help enhance transnational cooperation on matters of law, economy, human rights, and cybersecurity.

This article was first published on CircleID. Read the full article here.

Oct 012016
 
thank

“Today, after months of preparation and implementation of the community’s tasks, ICANN’s contract with NTIA expired. As a result, the coordination and management of the Internet’s unique identifiers is now privatized and in the hands of the volunteer-based multistakeholder community.”

These 2 sentences published today, October 1, 2016, by ICANN Board Chair Steve Crocker, have an air of history-in-the-making about them.

For the first time since it was created in 1998 to oversea the Internet’s naming (domain names and Top Level Domains) and addressing (IP addresses) functions, ICANN no longer has a direct contract with one government. The United States no longer have veto power over the way Top Level Domains such as .SKI (generic) or .EU (country code) are launched on the Internet.

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Jun 072016
 
Orange Logo

An example of a new gTLD actually being used, and a brand TLD at that, with telecom heavyweight Orange’s activation of http://startup.orange as a showcase for the company’s innovation support services.

This is in addition to http://entrepreneurclub.orange and http://airbox.orange/, the former being rerouted to a complex equivalent .COM address whilst the latter is not currently in public use.

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May 202016
 
wordpress

Sur Internet comme ailleurs, il y a ceux qui comprennent vite et il y a les autres. Les habitués des phrases comme “ça ne marchera jamais”, qui se transforment quelques années plus tard en “ah si j’avais su…”.

Lorsqu’en 2012, le régulateur technique de l’Internet (l’ICANN) a ouvert les candidatures à la gestion de nouvelles extensions, les “ça ne marchera jamais” en attendaient au mieux 500. C’est sûr qu’à 185 000 dollars les frais de dépôt de dossier à payer à l’ICANN, ça leur semblait cher. Puis 1930 dossiers furent déposés…

Lorsque, le 13 juin 2012, l’ICANN a annoncé ce raz-de-marée, les “ça ne marchera jamais” ont répondu qu’il s’agissait de spéculation de la part d’une industrie du nommage sur Internet immature. Les poids lourds du Net, eux, n’allaient quand même pas s’intéresser à quelque chose d’aussi rébarbatif que des noms de domaine. Puis en lisant la liste des candidatures reçues, on s’est rendu compte que Google avait demandé une centaine de nouvelles extensions et Amazon avait postulé pour 70…

Lire la suite sur le Huffington Post.

Mar 142016
 

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September 2017 will see a major event for the global architecture community when the International Union of Architects (UIA) Congress opens in Seoul, South Korea.

UIA World Congresses are now held every 3 years, with a total of 24 having been organised since the UIA’s inception in 1948.

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Feb 092016
 
YT

A screenshot of Nicolas Vuignier’s video iPhone experiment.

The Internet is going crazy over a video uploaded to YouTube by Swiss skier Nicolas Vuignier.

Shot with iPhone 6, the video offers incredible images of what appears to be Vuignier skiing whilst swinging the smartphone over his head.

It had almost a million hits in the first 24 hours and now, 3 days after its February 5, 2016 publication date, has already shot past 2 million views.

Vuignier is passionate about new technological developments. Beyond developing what is clearly a great technique for filming with iPhones, he’s also an early adopter of new gTLDs, more specifically .SKI. His video features his website http://www.nico.ski/, as picked up by CNET when they covered Youtube’s latest viral phenomenon.

Jan 262016
 

Sanders

World politics are becoming more and more digital-aware, and the US presidential election is no exception.

We are getting used to politicians being active on social media but a candidate embracing new gTLDs… now that’s impressive!

Taking full advantage of the “personal space” potential of the .BIO new gTLD, Democratic Party would-be nominee Bernie Sanders is showcased on the web address www.bernie.bio. The site claims independence from Sanders himself with a note stating that “This website was built & is maintained by volunteers with no official relation to Bernie Sanders.” It does however show avantgarde use of a new gTLD domain name by his supporters.

Sanders is considered former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s main rival for the Democratic Party Primaries set to start in February.